Fifteen years imaging the Red Planet

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On 25 December 2003, ESA’s Mars Express entered orbit around the Red Planet. The spacecraft began returning the first images from orbit using its High Resolution Stereo Camera just a couple of weeks later, and over the course of its fifteen year history has captured thousands of images covering the globe.

This video compilation highlights some of the stunning scenes revealed by this long-lived mission. From breathtaking horizon-to-horizon views to the close-up details of ice- and dune-filled craters, and from the polar ice caps and water-carved valleys to ancient volcanoes and plunging canyons, Mars Express has traced billions of years of geological history and evolution.

For regular news and image releases from Mars Express see http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

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9 Comments

  1. I'm amused that so far 40 people have given views of Mars the 'thumbs down'. What, in the words of Basil Fawlty, were they expecting? The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, perhaps?

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