NASA Briefing Previews Lunar Mission

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During a televised news briefing from NASA Headquarters on Thursday, Aug. 22, panelists discussed the agency’s next mission to the moon, and the first lunar mission launching from the Virginia coast. NASA’s Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission is scheduled to launch at 11:27 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6, from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Va. Data from the mission will provide unprecedented information about the environment around the moon and give scientists a better understanding of other planetary bodies in our solar system and beyond.

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15 Comments

  1. i think what you mean is we have the know how. we have no rockets with enough delta V to get men to the moon. without a better rocket, it is impossible.

  2. yes but it was inplied that they had to be returned safly to the earth. we do have rockets capible of getting one or possibly two men to lunar orbit or the surface but they would not be making the return trip.

  3. To be fair. watching this whole mission preview, Apollo features nowhere. This makes me wonder what the Apollo program achieved except "inspiring" a new generation. I think that after 6 successful manned landings, future lunar programs would leverage heavily on the first footprints and beaten path. This is far from the case. That said, I do not doubt that man landed in 1969. No. I am quite certain 😉

  4. For the people asking about the technology used in the first landing. 1) There was no backup for anything, Buzz Aldren ended up using a pen in a circuit breaker to get them off the moon, If he didn't they most likely would have died there. 2) This time you probably should be able to do more than just pick up some rocks and bring them back considering the cost involved. 3) They need some way to deal with the lower gravity issues on the human body.

  5. I doubt I will get an answer but I am curious if NASA has considered making vehicles that can be easily altered and reused in cases like the moon where we may return or even create a permanent presence there. In simple terms an erector set style vehicle.

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